Home > College Students > Certificate Programs >> Nuclear Power Technology Certificate Courses

Nuclear Power Technology Certificate Courses

ATTENTION:
TAMU College Station students
, please use the following course numbers when registering at http://HOWDY.tamu.edu:
Nuclear Power Plant Fundamentals (NUEN 432 - NPP FUNDAMENTALS)
Nuclear Power Plant Systems. Pressurized Water Reactors (NUEN 433 - NPP SYSTEMS-PWR)
Nuclear Power Plant Systems. Boiling Water Reactors (NUEN 434 - NPP SYSTEMS-BWR)
Nuclear Power Plant Operations (NUEN 435 - NPP Ops)
Human Performance For Nuclear Power Plant Engineers (NUEN 436 - HP)

Non-TAMU College Station students, please contact NPI representative at your university or contact Dr. Galina Tsvetkova at tsvetkovag@tamu.edu.

Current students go to http://nuclearpowerinstitutecourses.org.


Nuclear Power Plant Fundamentals

3 credit hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Understanding the operation of a nuclear power reactor; includes reactor water chemistry, material science, electrical science, mechanical science, civil engineering for nuclear power plant engineers, and digital process control systems.

The course is divided into seven sections (modules):

  1. Introduction to Nuclear Power Plant
  2. Water Chemistry for Nuclear Power Plant,
  3. Material Science,
  4. Electrical Science ,
  5. Mechanical Science,
  6. Civil Engineering for Nuclear Power Plant Engineers,
  7. Digital Process Control Systems.

Learning outcomes:

  • Students will be able to recognize and recall the basics of nuclear reactor terminology, definitions, and concepts associated with reactor physics and theory and technology of nuclear power plant.
  • Students will learn principles of water chemistry control for nuclear power plant systems.
  • Students will classify different materials and alloys in power plant application and describe effects of radiation on them such as fracture of nuclear fuel, stress development in the reactor vessel wall, erosion/corrosion effects.
  • Students will apply their knowledge of basic electrical theory, basic alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory in application to nuclear power.
  • Students will apply their knowledge of mechanical engineering principles to the theory of valve fundamentals and components, pumps, turbines, vibration, rotating equipment safety
  • Civil engineering design principles and considerations will be named.
  • The construction and principle of operation of the different sensing and indicating devices used at power plants will be explained to students.

Nuclear Power Plant Systems. Pressurized Water Reactors

3 credit hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Principal elements of pressurized water reactor nuclear power systems; overview of reactor physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer; focus on systems with both function and interfaces stressed throughout; includes basic reactor physics, reactor heat generation, reactor plant systems, support systems, and reactor safety.
This course is offered to students pursuing non-nuclear majors. The course introduces students to the

  • Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core Systems: the systems unique to the PWR for control of the fission process and the associated systems and strategy for reactor safety.
  • Power Plant Generation: the balance of plant equipment used in the steam cycle.

This course ensures that students understand engineering principles associated with systems and components used in two types of commercial nuclear power plants.

Learning outcomes:

  • Students will learn and utilize basic nuclear reactor terminology, definitions, and concepts associated with design and operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR).
  • Students will apply basic engineering principles in analyzing the design and operation of various PWR plant systems and components, including the primary system, reactor vessel, reactor core, reactor coolant pumps, steam generators, emergency core cooling system, and auxiliary systems.
  • Students will learn to apply their knowledge of basic nuclear theory, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer to understand how energy is produced, converted, and transferred within the power plant.
  • Students will understand the interfaces of various systems and propose how they may interact under given scenarios.
  • Students will learn how specific safety systems operate and how they work as part of an integrated defense in depth safety philosophy.
  • Students will synthesize course concepts and engineering fundamentals in evaluating how the various systems behave during various evolutions such as power operations, startup, refueling, etc.

Nuclear Power Plant Systems. Boiling Water Reactors

3 credit hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Principal elements of boiling water reactor nuclear power systems; overview of reactor physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer; focus on systems with both function and interfaces stressed throughout; includes basic reactor physics, reactor heat generation, reactor plant systems, support systems, and reactor safety.
This course is offered to students pursuing non-nuclear majors. The course introduces students to the

  • Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Systems: the systems unique to the BWR for control of the fission process and the associated systems and strategy for reactor safety.
  • Power Plant Generation: the balance of plant equipment used in the steam cycle.

This course ensures that students understand engineering principles associated with systems and components used in two types of commercial nuclear power plants.

Learning outcomes:

  • Students will learn and utilize basic nuclear reactor terminology, definitions, and concepts associated with design and operation of a boiling water reactor (BWR).
  • Students will apply basic engineering principles in analyzing the design and operation of various BWR plant systems and components, including the primary system, reactor vessel, reactor core, reactor coolant pumps, steam generators, emergency core cooling system, and auxiliary systems.
  • Students will learn to apply their knowledge of basic nuclear theory, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer to understand how energy is produced, converted, and transferred within the power plant.
  • Students will understand the interfaces of various systems and propose how they may interact under given scenarios.
  • Students will learn how specific safety systems operate and how they work as part of an integrated defense in depth safety philosophy.
  • Students will synthesize course concepts and engineering fundamentals in evaluating how the various systems behave during various evolutions such as power operations, startup, refueling, etc.

Nuclear Power Plant Nuclear Operations

4 credit hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Overview of mass, momentum and energy conservation as it relates to nuclear power plants; includes coupled neutronic/thermal models to study plant operations semi-quantitatively achieving an integrated plant understanding.
Topics: Mass, momentum, and energy conservation. Neutron power kinetics. Coupled neutronic/thermal hydraulic modeling. Plant operations. Qualitative transient modeling. AGN/NSC demonstration transients.
The course objective is to have the student create coupled neutronic/thermal hydraulic models such that plant operations may be studied semi-quantitatively achieving an integrated plant understanding.

Learning outcomes:

  • Students will describe the behavior of NPP under different operational conditions.
  • Students will create coupled neutronic/thermal hydraulic models.
  • Students will be able to apply models for semi-quantitative analysis of plant operation.
  • Students will observe movies, read instructions of lab procedure and based on a given data perform the lab.

Human Performance For Nuclear Power Plant Engineers

2 credit hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course is divided into six modules: Human Performance Fundamentals, the Organization & the Processes, the Individual Worker, the Engineer, Corrective Action Programs and Root Cause Analysis, and numerous Case Studies including TMI-2, Chernobyl and Davis-Besse.
This course allows the student to understand the interrelationships associated with human performance and the role he/she plays in determining the workplace's human performance culture. In the words of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations "Goals to improve human performance should be developed to 1) anticipate and prevent active errors at the job site and 2) discover and eliminate process and cultural weaknesses in the organization. Managers and supervisors can improve job site performance by focusing on procedures, tools, equipment access, equipment condition, work environment, incentives, individual knowledge and skill, individual readiness, and motives to reduce the chances of error."

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand the importance of human performance and its effect on the a well-functioning organization.
  • Understand the nuclear safety culture and its implementation in nuclear facilities.
  • Ability to function effectively and safely on multidisciplinary and multicultural teams.
  • Ability to communicate effectively with peers, subordinates, and superiors.
  • Understand professional and ethical responsibilities in nuclear organizations.